Tooth root resorption: what you need to know

Feb 28

Tooth root resorption: what you need to know

This blog discusses the causes, effects, and possible solutions to internal and external resorption. What is tooth root resorption? Tooth root resorption is a condition that affects the roots of teeth. It can cause the roots to become thin and weak, leading to tooth loss. please keep reading to find out more about root resorption, its causes, and types

What is Dental resorption?

Resorption is a common phenomenon that may occur due to dental injury or trauma, resulting in the loss of a part of the tooth structure or parts of the tooth structure. External and internal resorption can affect many areas of the tooth, including the root and crown. In some cases, resorption may only affect a small tooth area. However, resorption may progress in other cases until it affects the entire tooth.

Types of Tooth resorption

There are two types of tooth resorption: internal resorption and external resorption.

Internal resorption

Internal resorption is when the body reabsorbs the tooth from the inside out. This type of resorption is often painless and may not be visible to the naked eye.

External resorption

On the other hand, external resorption is when the body reabsorbs the tooth from the outside in. This type of resorption is often painful and may be visible to the naked eye.

Causes of Tooth Root Resorption

There are many possible causes of internal and external resorption. Some of the more common causes include:

-Dental trauma: Dental trauma can cause the roots of teeth to become weak and susceptible to resorption. Trauma to the teeth can occur due to a fall, a blow to the face, or even during dental procedures such as tooth extractions.

-Infection: Infections in the teeth can cause the roots of teeth to become weak and susceptible to resorption.

-Gum disease or periodontal disease: Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can destroy the bone around teeth. This can make teeth lose and eventually lead to their loss.

-Brushing too hard: Brushing your teeth too hard can damage the tooth enamel and make the roots of your teeth more vulnerable to resorption.

-Pregnancy: Pregnancy can also increase the risk of tooth resorption. This is because pregnancy causes a hormonal imbalance in the body. This imbalance can activate the osteoclasts and cause them to break down the tooth root.

There are many possible causes of internal and external tooth resorption. More common causes include dental trauma, periodontal disease, infection, gum disease, and brushing too hard. If you are concerned about any of these causes, talk to your dentist.

Other causes of root resorption

– Genetics: In some cases, tooth root resorption may be due to genetics. This means that it may run in families.

– Aging: As we age, our teeth may become more susceptible to resorption.

– Smoking: Smoking can increase the risk of internal and external root resorption.

-Baby teeth: Internal root resorption is a common phenomenon in baby teeth. It is a common cause of tooth loss in young people. As the child grows, primary teeth are shed off to make way for permanent teeth. The phenomenon of losing primary teeth occurs by internal resorption. The roots resorb, and the tooth becomes loose and falls off to make space for permanent teeth.

Tooth Root Resorption Treatment

There are many possible treatments for tooth root resorption. The type of treatment that is right for you will depend on the severity of your condition and the underlying cause. Some of the more common treatments include:

Root canal treatment: Root canal therapy is a procedure used to treat infections in the roots of teeth. The infected tissue is removed from the dental pulp and replaced with a filling material during this procedure.

-Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat tooth root resorption. This may involve the removal of part or all of the affected tooth.

-Dental implants: Dental implants are a type of artificial tooth inserted into the jawbone. They are used to replace missing teeth.

There are many possible treatments for tooth root resorption. The type of treatment that is right for you will depend on the severity of your condition and the underlying cause. Talk to your dentist about the best treatment for you.

Normal Dental resorption   

Normal dental resorption is a common phenomenon in baby teeth. It is what causes primary teeth loss in young people. As the child grows, teeth roots are resorbed to make them loose and make way for permanent teeth.

The resorption process begins with developing a small lesion on the root surface and eventually tooth loss. If you are concerned about your child’s dental health, talk to your dentist.

How is the root resorbed?

The root is resorbed by the body’s cells, which break down the tooth structure. This process is called osteoclast activity. Osteoclasts are cells that break down bone and other tissues.

The Periodontal ligament absorbs the root

A Periodontal ligament is a group of tissues that attach the tooth to the bone. This ligament is essential for providing support and stability to the tooth.

When the root is resorbed, the periodontal ligament becomes weaker and can no longer provide adequate support to the tooth. This can lead to mobility of the tooth and eventually tooth loss.

If you are concerned about any of these causes, talk to your dentist. There are many possible external or internal tooth resorption treatments, including surgical options, so don’t hesitate to seek treatment.

Periodontal support is essentially cervical

Cervical refers to the neck or lower part of the tooth. The periodontal ligament attaches the tooth to the bone at the cervical level.

When the root is resorbed, the periodontal ligament becomes weaker and can no longer provide adequate support to the tooth. This can lead to mobility of the tooth and eventually tooth loss.

Orthodontically induced resorption

Orthodontic treatment involves using braces or other devices to align the teeth. Excessive orthodontic force can sometimes cause tooth root resorption. The root surface is resorbed by the body’s cells, which break down the tooth structure.

If you are currently undergoing orthodontic treatment, tell your dental professional about any concerns you have. There are many possible treatments for tooth root resorption, don’t hesitate to seek treatment.

Tooth Root Resorption: Prevention

The best way to prevent either internal or external root resorption is to regularly practice good oral hygiene and see your dentist for checkups and cleanings. Be sure to brush twice a day, floss daily, and use mouthwash as directed. Also, be sure to eat a healthy diet and avoid smoking.

What are the symptoms of root resorption?

The most common symptom of root resorption is a tooth that is loose or falling out. Other symptoms may include:

-Sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures

-Pain when chewing or biting

-Swollen gums

-Bleeding gums

If you experience any of these symptoms, talk to your dentist. Your dental practitioner can often treat root resorption successfully if it is caught early. Left untreated, however, it can lead to tooth loss.

What is the best procedure for teeth with only the cervical third left after resorption?     tooth resorption

The best procedure for teeth with only the cervical third left after resorption is to have a dental implant. This will give you a new tooth that looks and feels like your natural tooth. Talk to your dentist about whether or not this is the right treatment option for you. They will be able to help you determine the best course of action for your situation.

Where do pulp and periodontal ligament cells of resorbed roots go?

Pulp and periodontal ligaments are separate connectives that undergo daily renewals to adapt to specific demands. Connective tissue cells are stable; they enter into a cycle of cells when normal growth factors challenge them. Some are undifferentiated and can differentiate in different morphology and functions.

Imaging aspects of root resorption and cervical bone density

The Imaging aspects of internal root resorption should be assessed in all patients with the condition.

Root resorption and cervical bone density should be assessed on panoramic radiographs, and cone-beam computed tomography (CB-CT) scans, which are more accurate for determining the alveolar ridge height and cortical thickness.

 

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/resorption#baby-teeth

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-root-canals

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/adult-oral-care/root-resorption-complications-causes-and-treatment

 

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